Category Archives: television

Remembering Broadcast Legends Jack Whitaker and Jack Perkins

Doug Miles and Don Henderson remember sportscaster Jack Whitaker who passed away at 95 and newsman Jack Perkins who passed away at 85 last week. Don worked with Jack Whitaker in Philadelphia. Jack Perkins was a frequent guest with us on radio in Sarasota.





Remembering Broadcast Journalist Jack Perkins who passed away at 85

I got to know Jack when he moved to Sarasota. He was a guest on my radio show several times. A gentleman and a class act all the way.





Don Henderson to be Inducted Into Philadelphia Broadcasters Hall of Fame

(Sarasota, FL) Congratulations to my broadcast colleague here in Sarasota, Don Henderson, who will be inducted into the Philadelphia Broadcaster’s Hall of Fame at their annual Hall of Fame Banquet November 22, 2019 at Hilton City Avenue, 4200 City Avenue in Philadelphia. Don continues to have a great career in broadcasting. Some of the highlights are listed in the following biography as posted on the Broadcast Pioneers website.

Broadcast Pioneers member Don Henderson was born in Trenton, NJ where he graduated from Trenton High School in 1952. While at Trenton High, he was a member of the Eastern States Swimming and Diving Championship Teams in 1950, 1951 and 1952. He was also a member of the NJ State Championship teams in the same years. He was selected by the National Interscholastic Swimming and Diving Coaches Association as an All American. In 1952 Don went to the University of Texas on a swimming scholarship. He also played baseball at Texas University.

From 1957 until 1960, Don broadcast on WBUD in Trenton. He did the daily sports show and a two-way telephone show, 2 hours a day, Monday through Friday. During that time he also covered High School football, basketball and also did Eastern Professional Basketball and college basketball.

From 1960 to 1964, Don moved to WTTM in Trenton where he broadcast football and basketball as well as a 2-way talk radio show. At that time, he also broadcast boxing from Madison Square Garden.

During the 1960s, Don had a 2-hour Jazz show which aired from the Club Fifty in Trenton, which he owned with his brothers. The show featured Doc Severinsen, Coleman Hawkins, Clark Terry, Jerome Richardson, Herbie Green and The Art Farmer Quintet. The house band members included Johnny Coates Jr, Tony Di Nicola and John Ellis.

In 1967, Don moved to Channel 29 in Philadelphia to create a new show. It was part of a news block which consisted of two newscasts, 6 pm and 11 pm. He worked with Taylor Grant, Alan Scott, who did the news and Carol Henderson, who did the weather. While at Channel 29, Don created the first two-way talk television show in Philadelphia. He broadcast major college basketball games and interviewed major sports personalities from the Phillies, Sixers, Eagles and the Flyers. He also created the Notre Dame pre-game show with Eagle quarterback Norm Snead. He also did the wrap up show. Don also worked for Channel 17 covering indoor soccer.

At WCAU Radio (now WPHT) Don did two-way talk shows, the Phillies General Manager Show, Pre and Post Phillies game shows, play by play by the Philadelphia Sixers, The Buddy Ryan Show, from the Ribbet and the Mike Schmidt Show. While at WWDB, he did 76’ers basketball and morning sports news. While at WIP, he covered Temple football.

For 16 years he broadcast Temple basketball plus the NCAA Tournament games and the NIT for Temple University. On Prism TV, he broadcast 76’ers basketball play by play and Philadelphia Inquirer Track and Field.

While at Philadelphia Park Race Track along with Hugh Gannon, Don created simulcast betting on TV and he also interviewed the owners, jockeys and trainers.

In Don’s retirement, he worked in Sarasota, Florida for Comcast, Channel 19 and WSRQ 1220, and WTMY radio covering sports and entertainment. Currently Don does a two-hour talk Internet blog show once a week on the Fighting Network from Sarasota covering all sports.





MOR-TV To Air Two Tampa Bay Bucs Games Including London Tilt with Carolina

(Tampa, FL) MOR-TV announced today that it has been named the exclusive broadcast station in Tampa Bay for both Tampa Bay Buccaneers vs. Carolina Panthers regular season NFL games.

The first game to air will be at Carolina on Thursday, September 12th at 8:20PM. The second game will be played at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium in London on Sunday, October 13th at 9:30AM.

Each game will be preceded by MOR-TV’s Countdown to Kickoff pre-game show at 6:30PM on September 12th and 8:00AM on October 13th.

“We are beyond excited to broadcast these NFL matchups for all our viewers at home,” explains Pam Barber, President & General Manager of MOR-TV and Estrella TV Tampa Bay.

MOR-TV can be seen over the air at 32.1; and on cable on Spectrum 12/HD 1012; Frontier Fios 12/HD 512; DirecTV 32, Dish Network 32, and Comcast 12/HD 437.





Apollo 11 50th Anniversary: Mutual Radio’s Don Blair talks about covering the recovery mission

Don Blair anchored the radio coverage of the Apollo 11 splashdown in July 1969 for the Mutual Radio Network. In this TV interview I did with Don in 2005, he talks about broadcasting to one of the largest audiences in radio history and his book “Splashdown, NASA and the Navy”. Don Blair passed away in Dec. 2018.





Remembering the great Tim Conway who passed away at 85

I had the honor of talking with Tim Conway on radio several years ago. He was as nice as he was talented.





Interview with Joyce Randolph aka “Trixie Norton” on “The Honeymooners”

My radio interview with actress Joyce Randolph known to millions of TV fans as Trixie Norton on “The Honeymooners”. This was originally aired on WIBQ (now WSRQ) radio in Sarasota, FL in 2004. Bob Biermann is the other voice who was co-hosting the show that day.





Artist Spotlight Mary Tyler Moore

Doug Miles talks with Herbie J. Pilato author of “Mary: The Mary Tyler Moore Story” about one of television’s most popular stars. Autographed copies of the book are available at Herbie’s website: https://www.herbiejpilato.com.





Sarasota Film Festival Review: “Mike Wallace is Here”

(Sarasota, FL) The Sarasota Film Festival opened Friday night with a screening of a “Mike Wallace is Here”, a documentary that generated a lot of buzz at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. The film vividly tells the story of arguably the most famous television journalist of the 20th century.

If you remember Mike Wallace from his days on “60 minutes”, you know his hard-hitting interview style that he created first in the 1950’s and later became his trademark on “60 Minutes”. This film goes back and tells his entire career story of when he began in early radio in the late 1930’s and 1940s doing shows like “The Green Hornet” and “Sky King”. Wallace was a radio actor and announcer before going into early television where he did commercials and talk shows. He also acted, hosted game shows and variety shows. But Mike Wallace, born Myron Leon Wallik in Brookline, Massachusetts in 1918, made his name doing a show called “Night Beat” on the old Dumont Network with a raw, hard-hitting one-on-one interrogation style which was at the time very unique, unusual and ground breaking. That show went on to the ABC network and lasted for several years.

The film depicts how Wallace decided to a change his career to being strictly a newsman. The tragedy of his son Peter who died in 1962 in Greece was the impetus to dedicate himself to doing more meaningful journalism. Wallace joined CBS and worked as a general reporter before he and producer Don Hewitt were given a directive to come up with an idea do something. What they created in 1968 was a revolutionary concept at the time, a magazine for television called “60 Minutes”.

The broadcast got low ratings for several years until the Watergate scandal in the early 70’s when the show took off and eventually became number one. Wallace’s investigative no holds barred style of reporting made him a household name.

The documentary directed by Avi Belkin, delves into the tough times including Wallace’s suffering from depression after being sued by General William Westmoreland over a report on the Viet Nam War and his failed marriages. Wallace admits in a candid interview done by colleague Morley Safer, that he was not a great father or husband and at one time thought of committing suicide.

Belkin makes great use of vintage footage from the CBS archives as well as kinescope clips from Wallace’s early career in television showcasing how versatile he was as a broadcaster. It wasn’t always a smooth ride for Wallace getting to the top of his profession, but it sure wasn’t dull.

“Mike Wallace is Here” will be distributed to theaters later this year according to Belkin, who held a Q&A after the screening in Sarasota. In the meantime, the documentary is being shown at other film festivals throughout the country. Highly recommended.





Sports Talk with Don Henderson and Doug Miles 4-6-19

Don Henderson and Doug Miles recap the first week of major league baseball, preview the NHL playoffs and Masters.