USF Bulls Agree to Home and Home Football Series with Boise State

(Tampa, FL) The USF Bulls will play a home and home football series with Boise State beginning in 2025 Vice President of Athletics Michael Kelly announced today. The Bulls and Broncos will meet for the first time on Aug. 30, 2025 in Raymond James Stadium. USF will travel to the famous blue turf in Boise, Idaho on Sept. 11, 2027.

“Boise State is a very exciting addition to our football schedule and one I believe will have national interest,” Kelly said. “The Broncos have a highly successful program that has been prominent on the national stage over the last two decades, and I think our student-athletes and fans will look forward to two high quality games and a trip out west to compete on the blue turf.”

USF also announced other schedule adjustments: A return game in Tampa vs. San Jose State, originally slated for the 2023 season, has been moved back to Sept. 20, 2025 in Raymond James Stadium. The Bulls visit to Northern Illinois, originally set for Aug. 30, 2025, will be moved to Sept. 25, 2027 in DeKalb, Illinois.

USF’s 2025 season non-conference schedule now contains games vs. Boise State (Aug. 30), at Florida (Sept. 6) and vs. San Jose State (Sept. 20), with one date remaining to be filled.

The Bulls and Broncos have never played against each other in football and USF has never played in the state of Idaho. The 2027 game in Boise, Idaho will mark just the fifth game for USF in the west. The Bulls will play at BYU in 2021 in the first western locale game on the schedule since USF won at San Jose State in 2017.

Boise State has played in 18 bowl games and won 12, including a 3-0 mark in Fiesta Bowl appearances, while claiming 19 conference titles. Entering head coach Bryan Harsin’s sixth season in 2019, the Broncos have won at least nine games every year under Harsin and compiled a 52-15 record in his tenure. The Broncos posted a 10-3 mark last season, losing in overtime to No. 25 Fresno State in the Mountain West championship game.

USF currently has 13 scheduled non-conference games vs. Power 6 opponents over the next eight seasons (through 2026) in addition to home-and-home series vs. Boise State (2025 & 2027) and BYU (2019 & 2021).

The Bulls will play six of those games vs. ACC opponents, including contests vs. Georgia Tech (2019), N.C. State (2021 & 2024) and Louisville (2022, 2024 & 2026). Future schedules also include dates vs. SEC foe Florida (2022, 2023 & 2025), Big 12 opponent Texas (2020, 2022 & 2024) and Big Ten foe Wisconsin (2019).





“Book Talk” guest Ian Doescher author “William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Mean Girls”

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Book recommendation: “The Problem of Democracy, The Presidents Adams Confront the Cult of Personality”

Book recommendation: “The Problem of Democracy, The Presidents Adams Confront the Cult of Personality” by Nancy Isenberg and Andrew Burstein. Timely for today’s politics. https://amzn.to/2DjJ6qH





Book Review: “After the Miracle, the Lasting Brotherhood of the ’69 Mets” by Art Shamsky

Fifty years ago, a baseball team captured the hearts of generations of New Yorkers by winning a World Series against improbable, if not impossible odds. That team, nicknamed “The Amazin’ Mets” continues to live on in the memories of those who experienced a special time in New York baseball.

One of the players on that team, Art Shamsky, has written a book (“After the Miracle, the Lasting Brotherhood of the ’69 Mets”) recounting each game the Mets played against the powerhouse Baltimore Orioles. More importantly, the book describes a poignant mini-reunion at the California home of the Mets ace pitcher, Hall of Famer Tom Seaver, who is sadly battling dementia.

Seaver recently announced the diagnosis, which came as a shock to baseball fans around the country who saw him pitch and still imagine the right-hander as forever young in their hearts and minds.

Bud Harrelson, the Mets gritty shortstop, who made the trip to see his former teammate, is also fighting dementia, making this reunion perhaps a final chance to reminisce about that great season a half century ago.

Shamsky, along with fellow outfielder Ron Swoboda, pitcher Jerry Koosman and Harrelson got together at Seaver’s Fresno, California home where he has been growing grapes and making wine since he retired as a pitcher and longtime broadcaster of both the Mets and Yankees and before that NBC’s Game of the Week.

According to Shamsky, it was a hit or miss opportunity to make this reunion happen. Seaver’s wife of more than 50 years, Nancy told him that Tom has good and bad days and to call before heading over. Fortunately, on the day the group made the long drive from San Francisco to Seaver’s home, Tom was having one of his good days. The former teammates had lunch, walked in the vineyards and went back in time to relive the great moments of their championship season.

As a 3rd grader in 1969, I wasn’t yet following the day-to-day goings on in sports that closely in New York. However, as the Mets became the talk of baseball in September and won the division and eventually the National League pennant, we all started to pay attention. During lunch recess, our elementary school wheeled these old, black and white TV’s into the auditorium so we could watch a few minutes of the World Series. Remember, those were the good old days when the Series was played in the afternoon.

When the Mets won the World Series in game five, a teacher came outside as we were waiting for the school bus and told us the news. The celebration on the ride home was as jubilant as what was going on at Shea Stadium.

I recommend the book for anyone who would like to relive that special time or for those who want to find out what made it so meaningful.

Click here to listen to my conversation with Art Shamsky.





“Book Talk” guest Jessica Yellin author “Savage News”

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1969 Mets Outfielder Art Shamsky Interview “After the Miracle”

Doug Miles talks to Art Shamsky about his book on the 1969 Mets “After the Miracle, The Lasting Brotherhood of the ’69 Mets”. You may order the book below in the Amazon box.





USF Bulls Show Signs of Improvement in Spring Football Showcase Saturday

(Tampa, FL) The USF Bulls played its spring football game Saturday afternoon at Corbett Stadium on campus as fans got a first look at new Offensive Coordinator Kerwin Bell’s offense.

Starting quarterback Blake Barnett set the tone by throwing a 75-yard touchdown pass to tight end Mitchell Wilcox on the very first play. By the final whistle, USF’s offense produced five touchdowns and two field goals in a 73-36 victory over the defense, which was limited by spring practice rules.

“I just feel like we’ve got a lot of momentum coming from this spring camp and I think we’re going to take that into the fall,” said Wilcox, a senior from Tarpon Springs, Fla., who led all receivers with 90 yards on two catches.

Saturday’s scoring system featured normal point totals for touchdowns and field goals on top of two points being awarded for 15-plus yard plays and one point for fourth-down conversions. Defensively, three-and-outs counted for three points, turnovers counted for four and fourth-down stops earned the Bulls one point.

“I like the way the offense just came out. They were able to operate,” head coach Charlie Strong said. “Defensively with the scoring system, defensive guys got mad at me because I took away the sacks and tackles for loss, which could have added more points to the score.”

USF’s offense was certainly happy with the result after producing what would have been 41 points in a real game situation as all three quarterbacks threw at least one touchdown and combined for 509 yards passing.

Behind Barnett, redshirt freshman Jordan McCloud completed 17 of 25 passes for 228 yards and two touchdowns. Before McCloud’s scores, redshirt freshman Octavious Battle threw a 29-yard pass to Jernard Phillips for a score and added a 10-yard TD pass to slot receiver Bryce Miller in the first quarter.

“From day one of spring practice to where we are now, we’ve come a million miles on offense,” head coach Charlie Strong said.





Greg Kinnear’s Directorial Debut Film “Phil” Closes Out 21st Annual Sarasota Film Festival

Sarasota, FL) The 21st Annual Sarasota Film Festival concluded Saturday evening with the screening of Greg Kinnear’s directorial debut film “Phil” at the Sarasota Opera House. Kinnear also appeared in a Q&A earlier in the day before a packed house at the Sage Restaurant in downtown Sarasota.

“Phil” is one of those movies that is difficult to categorize. It has some very funny moments and some dramatic dark moments. The film deals with the topic of suicide creating a delicate line that Kinnear as both an actor in the lead role and director walks with great skill in leading the audience on this storytelling journey.

Phil is a dentist who is dissatisfied and looking for more meaning in his life. We even see him contemplating suicide. When one of his patients Michael, played by Bradley Whitford, who exudes an apparent zest for life and is seemingly very successful I career and home life comes in for a routine cleaning, it sets Phil on his journey to find that same kind of zeal in his own existence.

SARASOTA, FL – APRIL 13: Greg Kinnear attends the 2019 Sarasota Film Festival on April 13, 2019 in Sarasota, Florida. (Photo by John Parra/Getty Images for 2019 Sarasota Film Festival)

Without giving away too much, Phil, who is divorced and has a teen-age daughter, follows Michael around for awhile and admires his home, family and especially his wife, played by Emily Mortimer. We are then shocked to see that Michael has committed suicide by hanging himself in the woods which Phil discovers while following him in his car. Phil goes to Michael’s funeral and in a funny and poignant scene, meets his widow Alicia. Phil pretends to be a friend of Michael that he knew many years ago in Greece and even takes on a Greek accent. Alicia is touched that Phil, pretending to be this friend, traveled all this way to honor her husband and invites him to her house. Phil then pretends to be a plumber and offers to finish a job Michael had begun refurbishing Alicia’s bathroom just to be able to be near her. While it sounds a bit creepy, Kinnear plays the part with such effective pathos that the audience can’t help but root for him. I’ll leave the plot there, but the film does end on a positive note and will leave you feeling good about what happened.

In other events during the festival, Emmy Award winning and Tony Award winning actress Blythe Danner was honored with the SFF Icon Award and Emmy Award winning and Tony Award nominated actress Anne Heche was honored with a Career Tribute Award. The festival also celebrated the groundbreaking of its new facility to be built in downtown Sarasota.





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Sarasota Film Festival Review: “Mike Wallace is Here”

(Sarasota, FL) The Sarasota Film Festival opened Friday night with a screening of a “Mike Wallace is Here”, a documentary that generated a lot of buzz at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. The film vividly tells the story of arguably the most famous television journalist of the 20th century.

If you remember Mike Wallace from his days on “60 minutes”, you know his hard-hitting interview style that he created first in the 1950’s and later became his trademark on “60 Minutes”. This film goes back and tells his entire career story of when he began in early radio in the late 1930’s and 1940s doing shows like “The Green Hornet” and “Sky King”. Wallace was a radio actor and announcer before going into early television where he did commercials and talk shows. He also acted, hosted game shows and variety shows. But Mike Wallace, born Myron Leon Wallik in Brookline, Massachusetts in 1918, made his name doing a show called “Night Beat” on the old Dumont Network with a raw, hard-hitting one-on-one interrogation style which was at the time very unique, unusual and ground breaking. That show went on to the ABC network and lasted for several years.

The film depicts how Wallace decided to a change his career to being strictly a newsman. The tragedy of his son Peter who died in 1962 in Greece was the impetus to dedicate himself to doing more meaningful journalism. Wallace joined CBS and worked as a general reporter before he and producer Don Hewitt were given a directive to come up with an idea do something. What they created in 1968 was a revolutionary concept at the time, a magazine for television called “60 Minutes”.

The broadcast got low ratings for several years until the Watergate scandal in the early 70’s when the show took off and eventually became number one. Wallace’s investigative no holds barred style of reporting made him a household name.

The documentary directed by Avi Belkin, delves into the tough times including Wallace’s suffering from depression after being sued by General William Westmoreland over a report on the Viet Nam War and his failed marriages. Wallace admits in a candid interview done by colleague Morley Safer, that he was not a great father or husband and at one time thought of committing suicide.

Belkin makes great use of vintage footage from the CBS archives as well as kinescope clips from Wallace’s early career in television showcasing how versatile he was as a broadcaster. It wasn’t always a smooth ride for Wallace getting to the top of his profession, but it sure wasn’t dull.

“Mike Wallace is Here” will be distributed to theaters later this year according to Belkin, who held a Q&A after the screening in Sarasota. In the meantime, the documentary is being shown at other film festivals throughout the country. Highly recommended.